News‎ > ‎News archive‎ > ‎

New data indicate that country- and center-specific economic factors impact on survival after HSCT

posted 24 Nov 2015, 08:31 by Eoin McGrath   [ updated 17 Oct 2016, 04:03 ]

Abstract

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a lifesaving expensive medical procedure. Hence, more transplants are performed in more affluent countries. The impact of economic factors on patient outcome is less defined. We analyzed retrospectively a defined cohort of 102,549 patients treated with an allogeneic (N = 37,542; 37%) or autologous (N = 65,007; 63%) HSCT. They were transplanted by one of 404 HSCT centers in 25 European countries between 1999 and 2006. We searched for associations between center-specific microeconomic or country-specific macroeconomic factors and outcome. Center patient-volume and center program-duration were significantly and systematically associated with improved survival after allogeneic HSCT (HR 0·87; 0·84–0·91 per 10 patients; p < 0·0001; HR 0·90;0·85–0·90 per 10 years; p < 0·001) and autologous HSCT (HR 0·91;0·87–0·96 per 10 patients; p < 0·001; HR 0·93;0·87–0·99 per 10 years; p = 0·02). The product of Health Care Expenditures by Gross National Income/capita was significantly associated in multivariate analysis with all endpoints (R2 = 18%; for relapse free survival) after allogeneic HSCT. Data indicate that country- and center-specific economic factors are associated with distinct, significant, systematic, and clinically relevant effects on survival after HSCT. They impact on center expertise in long-term disease and complication management. It is likely that these findings apply to other forms of complex treatments.

Gratwohl, A., Sureda, A., Baldomero, H., Gratwohl, M., Dreger, P., Kröger, N., … Brand, R. (2015).  Economics and Outcome After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Retrospective Cohort Study. EBioMedicine. doi:10.1016/j.ebiom.2015.11.021

Comments